Kayaking Accessories

Kayakers need a lot of gear to enjoy their sport, but the essentials are pretty simple. A kayak is a big “U” shaped boat with its top and bottom halves separated by air chambers. It’s steered and propelled by long paddlelike “oars.” After that it’s just a matter of adding whatever personal touches will help you get the most from your kayak experience.

colorful Kayaks
colorful Kayaks

We’ll concentrate here on the basics, working from the top of your body to the bottom and back again. Your head is protected by a safety helmet (required in many areas). To keep you warm and dry, choose a good wetsuit or drysuit, as well as booties and gloves that fit snugly for warmth without interfering with movement. You can also buy watertight socks that slip over shoes; they’re really tough enough only for calm waters though.

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Panic Button: Forget fashion – it’s best to dress right for the water temperature and conditions you expect to meet, because if you get too cold or wet it will spoil your fun. For example if surfing big waves be prepared for a swim.

Wearing a life jacket is particularly important when you’re on the open sea or any large body of water where there might be traffic and your boat could come to rest in an unexpected place, nooks and crannies included. A good life jacket not only keeps you afloat but also attaches easily to ropes so it can quickly be hauled up with you even if you’re unconscious. You don’t need the latest high-tech expensive kind; just choose one that’s snugly fitting and automatically inflatable with CO gas bottles as standard equipment (as opposed to those using manual pumps).

Another lifesaving item is a buoyant waterproof flashlight, which provides light for signaling rescuers and possibly more – some of them have mirrors, whistles, even little propellers that spin in the water.

Paddlers need their food and drink, of course, but it’s best to go prepared with everything you may conceivably need (within reason) instead of stopping ashore to shop every time you want something special. Carry your own repair kit containing spare parts for your kayak as well as for yourself; at least carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything.

Kayakers also need maps, charts or guides specific to the areas they will visit; these should be available either on board or ashore via rental services or tourist information centers—and don’t forget a compass! For weather forecasts contact local authorities; if you’re not too far from shore it’s also possible to get weather reports on marine radio.

Kayakers need all kinds of equipment, but the most important are an oar or paddle, a spray skirt (to keep you dry when you’re in rough water – cobble together your own if none is available), and flotation bags (inflatable pillows that can be hung off the boat in emergencies). A waterproof flashlight with extra batteries is essential; in addition carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. For maps and charts there are little maps of different coastal areas sold in stores everywhere; if you’re not far from shore it’s also possible to get weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful.

If possible, don’t leave port without a life jacket (required in many areas), safety helmet, warm or drysuit and waterproof flashlight. Be prepared with spare parts for your boat as well as yourself; carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. Carry food and drink, nautical charts of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful. Don’t forget to bring along additional CO gas cylinders for your inflatable flotation device (if your boat doesn’t come equipped with them) so it will work even if you’re unconscious. For maps and guides there are little maps of different coastal areas sold in stores everywhere. If you’re not far from shore it’s also possible to get weather reports on marine radio.

Be prepared with spare parts for your boat as well as yourself; carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. Carry food and drink, maps of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful. Don’t forget to bring along additional CO gas cylinders for your inflatable flotation device (if your boat doesn’t come equipped with them) so it will work even if you’re unconscious.

What should you carry in a kayak?

Most important is a paddle or an oar. If the boat doesn’t come with flotation bags, make your own from pillowcases and CO2 cartridges from inflatable mats. Carry some extra cartridges as spares.

A safety helmet is highly recommended as well as a life jacket approved for kayaking (required in many areas), drysuit, map of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but it’s extremely helpful to have one along just in case. Don’t forget to bring along spare CO gas cartridges for the flotation device so that even if you’re unconscious it will work properly. Some of these items can be rented at local outfitters where you buy them; others are available at sporting goods stores, navy surplus outlets and so on.

Don’t forget to bring along spare CO gas capsules for your flotation device so that even if you’re unconscious the boat will work properly.

What safety equipment is required on kayak?

So, if you’re going kayaking, make sure you’ve packed the right gear. You’ll need an oar or a paddle; CO2 flotation bags (inflatable pillows that can be hung off the boat in emergencies; compass; waterproof flashlight and extra batteries; thread and nylon cord for mending almost anything.

If possible, don’t leave port without a life jacket (required in many areas), safety helmet, warm or drysuit and waterproof flashlight. Be prepared with spare parts for your boat as well as yourself; carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. Carry food and drink, nautical charts of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful. Don’t forget to bring along additional CO gas cylinders for your inflatable flotation device (if your boat doesn’t come equipped with them) so it will work even if you’re unconscious.

For maps and guides there are little maps of different coastal areas sold in stores everywhere. If you’re not far from shore it’s also possible to get weather reports on marine radio. Be prepared with spare parts for your boat as well as yourself; carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. Carry food and drink, maps of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful. Don’t forget to bring along additional CO gas cylinders for your inflatable flotation device (if your boat doesn’t come equipped with them) so it will work even if you’re unconscious.

Do you need a whistle on a kayak?

In addition to a whistle or other noisemaker that can be used to signal if necessary, kayakers should carry plenty of water and snacks. In hot weather, this means at least a gallon of water per person. It’s also advisable to have a first aid kit along for minor cuts and scrapes as well as sunscreen and lip balm with an SPF rating. Kayakers should only take the amount of food they need-overloading their kayak can cause it to lose its balance.

Don’t leave port without a life jacket (required in many areas), safety helmet, warm or drysuit and waterproof flashlight. Be prepared with spare parts for your boat as well as yourself; carry some strong thread and nylon cord which can be used for mending almost anything. Carry food and drink, nautical charts of the area you’ll be exploring, weather reports on marine radio. A compass isn’t absolutely necessary, but is extremely helpful. Don’t forget to bring along additional CO gas cylinders for your inflatable flotation device (if your boat doesn’t come equipped with them) so it will work even if you’re unconscious.

In addition to a whistle or other noisemaker that can be used to signal if necessary, kayakers should carry plenty of water and snacks in hot weather-a minimum of a gallon per person. It’s also advisable to have a first aid kit along for minor cuts and scrapes as well as sunscreen and balm with an SPF rating. Kayakers should only take the amount of food they need-overloading their kayak can cause it to lose its balance.

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